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for "politico." josh rogin is a staff writer at "foreign policy" magazine. >> senator kerry will be nominated to be the next secretary of state. i went to get your first reaction to this and whether you think he is a better nominee than susan rice. >> i think in the world of john kerry -- i supported him for president. why wouldn't i support him for secretary of state? he is knowledgeable of foreign policy. he has chaired the foreign relations committee in the senate, knows all the issues. he understands the politics. he understands the electoral politics as well. i think it is an excellent choice. i think he will be very good secretary of state. susan rice withdrew from the nomination. i do not think it is fair to compare it the two. i think john kerry will be an excellent secretary. >> why you think it is not fair to compare the two? >> the rumor was that she was his first choice, but we do not really know if that is the truth. we've got to compare john kerry with john kerry, not with somebody else. >> what do you think his biggest hurdle will be in his upcoming confirmation hearings? >> i
is knowledgeable of foreign policy. he has chair the foreign relations committee in the senate, knows all the issues. he understands the politics. he understands the electoral politics as well. i think it is an excellent choice. i think he will be very good secretary of state. susan rice withdrew from the nomination. i do not think it is fair to compare it the two. i think john kerry will be an excellent secretary. >> what you think it is not fair to compare the two? >> the rumor was that she was his first choice, but we do not really know if that is the truth. we've got to compare john kerry with john kerry, not with somebody else. >> what do you think his biggest hurdle will be in his upcoming confirmation hearings? >> i do not think will have much of a hurdle. the senators know him. there has been a tendency for the senate to easily confirmed one of their own. he is knowledgeable. no one is going to deny that. he has all the credentials necessary to be a good secretary of state. >> mr. rogin? >> the senate usually does confirm members -- we know there is a huge opposition to the nomina
to the leader's role -- it got him to the leader's role, but he wants to get into foreign policy. one of the first things he does is he reaches out to one of the senator full rightbrights. he gets a call from senator byrd's office. they ask him to come in interview. he is stunned. he does not think senator byrd cares about or and policy. -- foreign policy. senator byrd convinces him he wants to be involved in foreign policy. as the book unfolds and as i learned about it, it is amazing to see how strong he is on foreign policy almost from the beginning. he plays this phenomenally important role. it is not just who has the votes, but he understands the substance better than anyone else. they all went down to panama, but he leads one of the first trips. he goes down there and he learns the panama issues. he brought the same dedication to every issue. one thing i say in the book is he knew that just being leader did not make you a great senator automatically. whoever heard of scott lucas and william nolan, senate majority leaders before lyndon johnson. you never heard of them because they
a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came
. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound- foolish when it comes to supporting america's vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign- policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another. i have
dollar. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another.
to get into foreign policy. one of the first things he does is he reaches out to one of the senator fulbrights. he gets a call from senator byrd's office. they ask him to come in interview. he is stunned. he does not think senator byrd cares about foreign policy. senator byrd convinces him he wants to be involved in foreign policy. as the book unfolds and as i learned about it, it is amazing to see how strong he is on foreign policy almost from the beginning. he plays this phenomenally important role. in the panama canal treaties. it is not just who has the votes, but he understands the substance better than anyone else. they all went down to panama, but he leads one of the first trips. he goes down there and he learns the panama issues. he brought the same dedication to every issue. one thing i say in the book is he knew that just being leader did not make you a great senator automatically. whoever heard of scott lucas and william nolan, senate majority leaders before lyndon johnson. you never heard of them because they did not do anything. robert byrd brought that extra dimension
for the undergraduate students and masters did it a public policy to connect with of foreign- policy thinkers. we're just pleased this afternoon to welcome the associate director for research of the ku research center. michael has co-authored a number of the pure research center landmark thoughts including in- that of political -- political and social values. next month michael will be promoted. he has a promotion. he will be the director of the pew research center for the people in the press to survey. pew, he wasng few up political science director at north carolina. he received his ph.d. from the university of california san diego. he was part of a team of analysts who correctly predicted the outcome of the popular vote to in this year's presidential election between mitt romney and president obama. today he will give us an overview of the events and values that shaped the 2012 election, while giving us an inside look at the challenges and choices, public opinion it researchers face and pre- election polls. please join me in welcoming him to the taubman center. [applause] >> thank you. it is a
religion and politics. in 45 minutes, it looked at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012.
desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever based upon whims. to me it is a natural thing to consider religion and believes when -- beliefs when you are considering issues. whether the economy, health care, anything else. it is informed by what you have been taught, how you have been raised, how you feel about fairness and other things. host: does it mak
committee, john has played a major role in every foreign policy debate in years. he understands we have to harness all elements of american power and ensure they are working together. diplomatic developments, economic and political and military and intelligence as well as the power of our values which inspires so many people around the world. as john as said, we're an exceptional nation not because we say we are but because we do exceptional things. i would say one of the things we have seen is when john helped lead the way along with folks likes john mccain to restore our -- to vietnam. it sent a powerful message to congress. over the years john has earned the respect and confidence of leaders around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has arned the respect and trust of his colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few individuals know as many presidents, prime ministers or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry and this makes him a perfect choice guide american diplomacy in the years ahead. >> "washington journal"
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
you wrote about in a recent piece for foreign policy magazine, that the polarization around the constitution actually reflected in your view some broader divisions within egyptian society. the next step in this competition, if you will, within the egyptian polity, is going to be parliamentary elections, which as i understand it are supposed to take place just a couple of months after the constitution is approved, assuming that it is ultimately approved. what can you tell us based on what we've seen over the last couple of months about how the competition for parliamentary elections is likely to shape up? >> sure. thanks, tammy. so, yes, in theory there is supposed to be parliamentary elections within two months. i think the big question here are liberals and non-islamists going to be brought back into the democratic process or are there still going to be elements that say the whole process is flawed, rigged, illegitimate, and they start to withdraw. and there was this debate in the lead-up to the referendum where you had parts of the opposition saying boycott because they do
the biggest foreign policy events for 2012. and the biggest political stories of 2012 with a political analyst on williams. every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the taping system was top secret. it seems the only people that knew for certain where my father, his secretary, and the secret service agents that installed it. and other presidential recording systems were revealed. the concept of secret taping can seem problematic, but it is beyond doubt that it is a unique and invaluable historical resource. on the states, history unfolds in real time in the most dramatic possible way. with your the confrontations of the civil-rights movement and the life or death situations we made a during the cuban missile crisis. >> the discussion of the recordings of the late president in the oval office. >> michele obama and to white house chefs recently held a demonstration of holiday crafts with children in the state dining room. >> will also have different ornaments made by artists in chicago. and all of the other ornaments on the tree here have been from previous years. them in areuse different format. the
that might influence their foreign policy and some of the military policies. >> on the upside there? >> what about china's continental border with russia. what about china buying into actuallyand actually, wa colonizing siberia? how does that worry the united states, china getting stronger on account of siberia and throw a have not heard on any proposal? >> i have not heard of any proposals of china buying into siberia. >> oh, investment. >> united states once a prosperous china that assumes greater responsibility and engagement from the world commensurate with its capabilities and economic power. we do not want china simply to grow and take a free ride or get a free ride on everything else that is happening around world. china needs to step up and take a responsible role in managing international affairs, whether it is conflict in africa, to the middle east, to north korea, and elsewhere. we're seeing some of that already. there's good cooperation on many issues, including afghanistan, engagement with china on issues of north korea. we may not always agree, and certainly china has cut back
in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence, as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. as john has said, we are an exceptional nation not because we say we are, because we do exceptional things. and i'd say that one of the more exceptional things we've seen in recent decades was when john helped lead the way, along with folks like john mccain and others, to restore our diplomatic ties with vietnam. when he returned to the country where he and so many others had fought so long ago, it sent a powerful message of progress and of healing. over these many years, john's earned the respect and confidence of leaders around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust of his senate colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few ind
world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time to think that you could fix and watch with a hammer. yeah, so we did. we went on the road and in many ways had our faith in the american process and our country restored by meeting some wonderful, committed people, who really mean extremely well and have the future of this country in their hearts and minds. but we raised the better part of $10 million, and it ain't right, you know? i do not know a lot about election reform, but it seems it breaks into two areas. one is the campaign and the other is the actual election itself. fixing the campaign is going to be tough, trying to get the money out of it, trying to get some forms in the place of our debates that actually give us a clear idea of who the candidate is and what they intend for the country -- that is a difficult and tall order. trying to streamline it so that it does not take two years to run for public office. these are difficult things to accomplish, and i do not know how we go about it. it seems as though there is a sign of election reform, the process itself,
the bureau and employees there in an emergency. my foreign policy summit is to be there when there are emergencies around the world. i have colleagues i grew up with, judy woodruff has three children, including a child with special needs. compton has four children. producers are having children and coming back. our top producer is married to someone on the hill with two kids at home. she travels with the president all the time. there are ways. corporations are much more flexible in broadcasting now. alexander wallace, one of our top executives, ann curry with family. it can be done. it involves a lot of tough tradeoffs. our corporate culture ought to be more forgiving in support of. sadly, that is rarely the case. >> i was the chairman of the nrc. my son was entering high school. we made the decision not to move here to not disruptive. we left him in the school he was in. that means my husband during the week did everything. as much as i could, i went home every weekend. i did not participate in the washington social scene all the time. but we felt it was important to do the
at the biggest foreign policy events of the year. >> i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay. i went down to the liberal party. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought it was acucute. she asked me why and i made an early case for lindsey and i made the case against his opponent. she handed me a box of pastry. i took a back to headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics and i was told you can keep the money. >> david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. fall by the all women delegation of new hampshire. then growing up in the white house. tonight on c-span. >> there was a forum on women in leadership. hilda solis spoke about her career and serving in the obama administration. >> good morning. they come from los angeles and cleveland and baltimore. poor and white. each of them have one thing in common. they are all successful. each rose to the top of their field in the arts or politics or sports. we will talk
want to introduce herb. she has her own show on them as nbc. she covers foreign-policy for the network. she is one of the bust respected and we are delighted she is here. next to her is surely an jackson. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 196
reduce our dependence on foreign oil and that is good for our national security. so i think we need a comprehensive energy policy in this country in order to protect our national security, in order to ensure that we begin to clean up our environment better, and in order to make sure that we're not sending men and women overseas in harm's way for foreign oil. [applause] >> thank you. >> there's so much to talk about. we are running just a little bit long. if he could indulge me, i have two last questions that i think you're terrific questions. -- are terrific questions. the first, the truth is that we're one of the few democracies in the world that has not had a team of president. why and when will we? [laughter] and could she be sitting among us today? [laughter] kelly, would you like to start? [laughter] >> i think i will be campaigning for a patent daily, my daughter, -- kate daly, for president. but absolutely, i think we will have a woman president. i really think it will certainly be in my lifetime if not soon. >> maybe 2016 when hillary runs. >> maybe. [laughter] [applause] >
and helps us reduce our dependence on foreign oil and that is good for our national security. i think we need a comprehensive energy policy in this country in order to protect our national security, in order to ensure that we begin to clean up our environment better, and in order to make sure that we're not sending men and women overseas in harm's way for foreign oil. [applause] >> thank you. mucto talkso about. we are running just a little bit long. if he could indulge me, i have two last questions that i think you're terrific questions. the first, the truth is at we're one of the few democracies in the world that has not had a team of presiden. why and when will we? [laughter] and could she be sitting among us today? [laughter] kelly, would you like to start? [laughter] >> i think i will be campaigning for a patent daily, my daughter, for president. but absolutely, i think we will have a woman president. i really think it will certainly be in my lifetime if not soon. >> maybe 2016 when hillary runs. >> maybe. [laughter] [applause] >> did you have a thought on that, carol? >> i certainl
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)